01 April 2012

Easter tutorial: How to color eggs with onion shells

My favorite holiday is coming up so I thought I would re-post this tutorial from last year. For me, this is the only way to color easter eggs! With flowers, leafs, feathers and onion shell. Most people I meet have never heard of this method (unless they're from eastern europe that is). So I thought I would share it with you.


This is what you need! Flowers, leafs, string, eggs and onion shell. The bigger onion shells the better. Just go to the supermarket and dig around in the onion box. You'll find quite a lot!


Moist the egg and the flowers/plants with water, that will make it easier for them to stick to the egg. Don't put flowers over the eggs stamp, that will make it stick out..and you want to hide that ugly stamp. I recently discovered that putting a little feather makes a beautiful print!


Moist the onion shells and wrap it carefully around the egg. Don't move around the flowers. Red onion shell colors much much more than yellow. But it can color too much. It's beautiful when you put little pieces of red onion shell around the egg though.



Wrap the string tight around the egg. String that's wrapped around sloppy will fall of when it's cooking. Also, use a lot of string. The tighter you spinn the flowers and onion to the egg, the better prints you'll get.


Put all the eggs together with the onion shell leftovers into a pot. Cook it for about 15 minutes. These eggs are supposed to be eaten and not hung on branches!


Rinse the cooked eggs in cold water and wrap the string and onion shell carefully of.


This beautiful print was made with a little white swan feather. The reddish tone on the right is from red onion shell.


Rub the eggs in bacon or some other grease to make them shine even when they're dry. You don't have to do this but it gives them a extra nice appearance!


Go outside and find some nice moss, the eggs will look beautiful resting on it :) Good luck! I hope you try this during eater. If you're not an onion fan you can always give it a try with silk otherwise!  Here's a tutorial on how to do it with silk ties. 

55 comments:

  1. These eggs are beautiful! I have never heard of this method, but it's definitely something I will try this easter. Thanks for sharing these creative gems :)

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    1. It's a very common in Poland and other slavic countries :) the eggs turn out beautiful and are also edible. yum

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    2. It's possible to empty the eggs before you boil them. Place a ceramic bowl on top to prevent the eggs from floating. Makes the eggs last forever.

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    3. Yeah, my family always dyes the eggs with onion shells. We only use the shells though, without flowers or leaves, resulting in simple, single color eggs. Gotta try doing it like this this year, though.

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  2. This is a beautiful method of dying eater eggs. I have to say i really love the way the eggs look simply with the flowers stuck to them, quite amazing. I grew up dying my eater eggs with vegetables like beets, carrot, and grape juice, but i would love to try this. Thank you for sharing!

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  3. Wow!! The eggs look really lovely!

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  4. So beautiful.... How did you get the idea?

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  5. They are so beautiful! Perhaps I will try it with my family.

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  6. Ohhhh I do the same for Easter in my family! it is fantastic:)
    xxx
    Kat
    http://thehazardousarea.blogspot.co.uk/

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  7. Love how feather one turned out - will try with feathers this year.

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  8. wow! absolutely beautiful eggs! Thank for sharing the tutorial!

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  9. I used to do Easter egg hunts for years, even when I was an "Adult". I haven't been able to recently because I don't have a backyard, but making eggs this way will be great to do instead. I really love the natural beauty of it all :)

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  10. My mother makes them every year. She wraps the eggs with the design in new panty hose really tight and boils them that way. The design always stay on and it leaves a very nice print. She does not wrap onion peel on them just puts a bunch of them in the water that she boils them in.

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  11. beautiful! Hope to try this.

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  12. Love this!!how sensitive and deep it looks!
    The pics are great, congrats!

    Sonja

    http://eclecticsonja.blogspot.com.es/

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  13. I just saw a link to your tutorial on Vibekes blog (A Butterfly in my Hair). Thanks for sharing! Happy Easter.

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  14. great inspiration;)
    I'm greeting from Poland!

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  15. This is amazing! so pretty, i'm going to try it !!!

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  16. That's really cool. I could see this pattern for wrapping paper or something as well.

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  17. Hello, I am new to your beautiful blog (I followed a link on "a butterfly in my hair"). These eggs are absolutely breathtaking! I will definitely try them this Easter weekend. It will be so hard breaking them to eat! (though I do very much like hard-boiled eggs)

    I look forward to reading and seeing more of your world.

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  18. SOOOOOOO LOVELY

    We do this every year but use a slightly different (and I think easier) method.

    (In danish but you can take a look here if you want: http://badut.typepad.com/badut/sådan-farver-du-æg-med-løgskaller.html )

    This method have been used for generations and the results arel the most lovely I know.

    SPINGLOVE from Denmark

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  19. Wow, I've seen eggs dyed in onion skin but you've made them so much more beautiful!

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  20. lovely! what a great idea. I think I will give it a try =)

    P.S: I just came across your blog. Hi!

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  21. Wonderful! I linked to your lovely tutorial on my blog www.underthemulberrytree.squarespace.com Thank you!

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  22. I loved this process! Here are a few things I learned along the way, I hope it will help others:

    1. Buy tons of red onions. Think 1 onion's worth of skins for each egg. The closer the onions are to the size of the eggs, the better the skins will fit. Red onions worked better than yellow.

    2. Have a spray bottle of water handy. Uli says to moisten the eggs so the flowers, etc. will stick better. I found that having everything, including the onion skins, be dripping wet aided the process.

    3. Don't cover the eggs with stuff. The more shell stays exposed to the onion skins, the more of their color will transfer to the shell. The flowers and such, used sparingly, still provide lovely patterns against the rosy plant dye.

    4. Throw a bunch of beets in the pot with the eggs. They add extra color and when you're done, you're halfway to a nice salad Nicoise. I almost included red cabbage but didn't this time. If I try it in the future I'll post results.

    5. Olive oil worked as well as bacon grease to bring out the colors.

    It took patience and a steady hand, but was worth it!

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  23. Really nice!!! Is a bit late for me, but I want to try :)

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  24. Uli, I saw this on your blog a few days ago, and made some to give to my family for Easter this morning - they loved them! I used little feathers, young leaves and flowers from the garden...and did some more using a silk tie I found in a charity shop. It worked really well! (they don't want to eat the eggs!)
    I hope I can make this a yearly tradition. Thank you so much for posting this :)

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  25. oh so lovely :) what a wonderful idea!

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  26. Mel, that's so great! It really is fun to give away on easter, people seldom understand how it was done :)

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  27. Easter is done already but i tried this yesterday anyways and it was great, but mine wasn't as pretty as yours. It was really hard for me not to move the flowers around. Any advices or tips?

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  28. oohhhh my gran always does it! But she just uses onion peel, doesn't put flowers on.

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  33. Just to clarify, you begin with raw eggs, and then when they're wrapped put them in cold water and boil them for 15 minutes?

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    Replies
    1. I was wondering the same thing. Do we begin with a raw egg?

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  34. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  35. u can use old tights for this.
    http://assembleshop.blogspot.com/2013/03/dyeing-easter-eggs-naturally-with-onion.html#.U00jK_mIXuM

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  36. Is this safe considering egg shells are permeable? I'm especially worried about the bird feather...

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  37. Can this be done with white onions?

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  38. This is awesome, and I am going to do it! But... raw bacon? Raw pork can easily contain nasty parasites. This cannot be safe to handle or eat. I'm sure there are other ways to shine them up. Grape seed oil is a light, not-too-greasy oil that definitely won't give anyone any parasites. Even a little Pam or butter would be good.

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  39. I made these eggs, and they turned out lovely! As I live in the desert, I used desert flowers and leaves, added snakeskin to the patterns. This had an unforeseen side effect, as I had forgotten that several of the ornamental leaves had their own dyes packed in. The eggs now have green and blue patterns seared in as well. Beautiful and, if you use plants from the surrounding area, taking on the character of that landscape as well.

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  40. These are absolutely beautiful and so creative. I love it.

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  41. Does anyone possibly know how long they stay dyed for? They are gorgeous :)

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